Running

Running Shoes

To the untrained eye, most running shoes look much the same but in fact each shoe is constructed uniquely in order to perform in a particular way. However, at the risk of oversimplifying, there are broadly three main categories of running shoe (which correspond to the three main styles of running):

  1. Stability shoes – which offer greater support/stability features (for over-pronators)
  2. Supportive shoes – which offer a blend of support and cushioning (for normal pronators or neutral runners)
  3. Cushioned shoes – which offer maximum cushioning (for supinators)

It is probably best to accept that there is some overlap of shoes and styles. For example, some over-pronators would find that a shoe such as the Saucony Valor would provide sufficient stability/support while another runner with a more neutral style might find it insufficiently so. Therefore, there may be some debate regarding how we have classified our shoe stock!

Pre-purchase checklist

Prior to purchasing your shoes, we recommend that you make the following basic checks to minimise the possibility of making an error:

  1. Foot arches: High, normal or low (tip: you can do a wet footprint test to check this – ie make a footprint on a flat, non-absorbant floor and consider the shape of the print)
  2. Leg shape: bow legged, straight legged or knock-kneed (tip: stand with feet together and look facing a mirror)
  3. Walk test: “Charlie Chaplin”, Slight “V” or pigeon toed (tip: ask someone to observe you walking in a straight line paying attention to the feet)
  4. Old shoe test 1: forefoot wear on the outside, middle or inside (tip: turn shoe over and see where the rubber has worn out the most)
  5. Old shoe test 2: shoes lean out, straight or in (tip: look at shoes from behind – do shoes appear to be leaning out or leaning in, or are they standing straight?)
SUPINATION NEUTRAL OVER-PRONATION
FOOT SHAPE
LEG SHAPE
FOREFOOT WEAR
REAR SHOE ANGLE

Consider carefully your results above. If you have ticked mainly the left hand column you should select a cushioned shoe. Ticks mainly in the right column would indicate the need for a stable shoe and a mixture of results and/or mainly in the middle column should result in the selection of a supportive shoe. Please note that this is just a guide to assist and cannot be relied on to be totally accurate.

THE SAFEST BET IS TO COME IN-STORE AND TALK WITH US AND TRY SOME SHOES ON!

Stability Shoes include

  • Asics GT2000

Supportive Shoes include

  • Asics GT 1000
  • Saucony Valor

Cushioned Shoes include

  • Asics Gel Pulse
  • Saucony Swerve
  • Nike Flex Run

We also stock Currex insoles – fantastic, customised “off the shelf orthotics” for athletes with high, medium or low arches.